Academie Universelle des Jeux, Contenant les Regles des Jeux de Quadrille, & Quintille de l'Hombre ? trois, du Piquet, du R?versis, des Echecs, du Trictrac; & de tous les autres Jeux....






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Academie Universelle des Jeux, Contenant les Regles des Jeux de Quadrille, & Quintille de l'Hombre ? trois, du Piquet, du R?versis, des Echecs, du Trictrac; & de tous les autres Jeux....

Book

Notes
TitleAcademie Universelle des Jeux, Contenant les Regles des Jeux de Quadrille, & Quintille de l'Hombre ? trois, du Piquet, du R?versis, des Echecs, du Trictrac; & de tous les autres Jeux....
AuthorTh?odore le Gras
Publisher
Year Published1739
Year originally published/written
Edition
ISBN
Number of pages on gamesApprox. 600
Of Historical InterestY
General NotesPages 532-556 describe Jeu de Mail. Period mottled calf, gilt-tooled spine, morocco spine label. New Edition. Paris: Théodore le Gras, 1739. The article on Jeu de Mail in this volume is taken directly from the rare 1717 work on the subject by Lauthier, in which he begins, "There are two kinds of rules for Jeu de Mail. Those upon the way to play well, and those upon the treatment of different emergencies which may arise during the game. We shall begin with the first, which are the most essential. It is certain that of all exercises Jeu de Mail is the most pleasant, the least fatiguing, and the best for health. It is by no means violent, and one can play, converse and stroll about in congenial company all at the same time...." The lengthy rules give descriptions of playing method, clubs, balls, and body attitudes, all of which bear strong resemblance to Scottish golf. According to Harry Wood in his lengthy section on Jeu de Mail & Het Kolven in Golf Curios and the Like, "In France, Jeu de Mail degenerated by way of Pall Mall in Croquet, just as the Dutch Kolf, no doubt originally a robust game, came at last to Het Kolven. Yet the French game, even in 1717, had far more in common with the Scottish golf than any form of Dutch golf of which we have any record or evidence. It was played in the open country, it was characterised by long driving, and its rules and practice show a much closer affinity with Scottish golf than any Dutch form of the game, of which, at least, any memorial survive."
Pages 532-556 describe Jeu de Mail. Period mottled calf, gilt-tooled spine, morocco spine label. New Edition. Paris: Théodore le Gras, 1739. The article on Jeu de Mail in this volume is taken directly from the rare 1717 work on the subject by Lauthier, in which he begins, "There are two kinds of rules for Jeu de Mail. Those upon the way to play well, and those upon the treatment of different emergencies which may arise during the game. We shall begin with the first, which are the most essential. It is certain that of all exercises Jeu de Mail is the most pleasant, the least fatiguing, and the best for health. It is by no means violent, and one can play, converse and stroll about in congenial company all at the same time...." The lengthy rules give descriptions of playing method, clubs, balls, and body attitudes, all of which bear strong resemblance to Scottish golf. According to Harry Wood in his lengthy section on Jeu de Mail & Het Kolven in Golf Curios and the Like, "In France, Jeu de Mail degenerated by way of Pall Mall in Croquet, just as the Dutch Kolf, no doubt originally a robust game, came at last to Het Kolven. Yet the French game, even in 1717, had far more in common with the Scottish golf than any form of Dutch golf of which we have any record or evidence. It was played in the open country, it was characterised by long driving, and its rules and practice show a much closer affinity with Scottish golf than any Dutch form of the game, of which, at least, any memorial survive."



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